Ontario Expands Support for Survivors of Sexual Violence Through the Language Interpreter Services


The Government of Ontario has taken a step to follow through on its commitments from the March 2011 Sexual Violence Action Plan to provide additional support to survivors of sexual violence by expanding the Language Interpreter Services (LIS) program.

On May 24, 2012, the Government announced that it will be “breaking down language barriers” by increasing access to services for survivors of sexual violence who do not speak English and/or French. It is estimated that this service expansion will help “1,000 more women a year who are victims of sexual violence get access to social, health care and legal services in their own languages”. According to the announcement, this “includes sign language interpretation for victims who are Deaf, oral deaf, deafened and hard of hearing and are also victims of domestic or sexual violence”.

The Language Interpreter Services (LIS) program provides interpreters and translators 24 hours a day for multi-lingual requests. For the past 20 years, the program has enabled service providers in Ontario to communicate with their clients who have limited English and/or French language skills, are Deaf, oral deaf, deafened or hard of hearing, and who are victims of domestic violence, sexual violence or human trafficking.

In Ontario, all service providers working with victims of domestic violence, sexual violence, or human trafficking are eligible to access language interpreters on behalf of their clients. The list of eligible agencies and service providers includes social services, healthcare, legal services, sexual assault centers, and the Domestic Violence Court Program. These agencies and service providers can access interpreter services that are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and 365 days a year in over 70 languages in person, by telephone or through videoconferencing.

Across the province, service providers can request these services by contacting one of eight agencies that currently deliver the Language Interpreter Services program. Agencies provide language interpreter services in the following regions of Ontario:

CENTRAL ONTARIO

Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic
Telephone: 416-323-9149
Fax: 416-323-9107
TTY: -416-323-1361
Web: www.schliferclinic.com
Location: 489 College Street, Suite 503, Toronto, ON, M6G 1A5

Multilingual Community Interpreter Services
Telephone: 416-426-7051
Toll Free: 1-888-236-8311
24-Hour Domestic Violence Emergency Line: 416-422-5984
Note: MCIS operates a 24-hour emergency interpretation service for the Domestic Violence Court Program and the Toronto Police Service to assist victims of Domestic Violence
Fax: 416-426-7118
Translation Department: 416-426-7051
Email General Inquiries:
info@mcis.on.ca
Email Translation Department: translation@mcis.on.ca
Email Intake Requests:
intake@mcis.on.ca
Web: http://www.mcis.on.ca/
Location: 789 Don Mills Rd, Suite 608, North York, ON M3C 1T5

WESTERN ONTARIO

Across Languages Translation and Interpretation Service
Phone: 519-642-7247
Fax: 519-642-1831
Email: info@acrosslanguages.org
Web: http://www.acrosslanguages.org/
Location: 515 Richmond Street, Unit 3, London ON, N6A 5N4

Information Niagara
Telephone Niagara Region: 2-1-1
Telephone Main:
905-682-6611
Toll Free: 1-800-263-3695
Fax: 905-682-4314
Web: http://www.informationniagara.com/
Location: 235 Martindale Road, Unit 10, St. Catharines, ON L2W 1A5

The Kitchener-Waterloo Multicultural Centre
Telephone: 519-745-2531
Interpreter Services: 519-745-2593
Fax: 519-745-5857
Web: http://www.kwmc.on.ca/
Location: 102 King Street West, Kitchener, ON N2G 1A6

The Multicultural Council of Windsor and Essex County
Telephone: 519-255-1127
Fax: 519-255-1435
Web: http://www.themcc.com/
Downtown Location: 245 Janette Avenue, Windsor, ON N9A 4Z2
East End Location: 7651 Tecumseh Road East, Windsor, ON N8T 3H1

EASTERN ONTARIO

Immigrant Women Services Ottawa
Telephone: 613-729-3145
Fax: 613-729-9308
Email: infomail@immigrantwomenservices.com
Web: www.immigrantwomenservices.com
Location: 219 Argyle Street, Suite 400, Ottawa, ON K2P 2H4

NORTHERN ONTARIO

Thunder Bay Multicultural Association
Telephone: 807-345-0551
Toll Free: 1-866-831-1144
Fax: 807-345-0173
Email: info@tbma.ca
Web: http://www.thunderbay.org/
Location: 17 North Court Street, Thunder Bay, ON, P7A 4T4

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The Language Interpreter Services (LIS) program is funded by the Ontario Women’s Directorate, and administered by the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration.

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Always remember that you may have been victimized by sexual violence, but by searching for help you have started your healing.

Survivors Guide

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Sexual Violence Against Young Women and Police Response


“[The police should] make us feel more safe and do more to make the community aware they are taking abuse seriously.” (Youth Alliance Report, p.14)

These are not my words, but I understand them.

Imagine if you filed a police report about the sexual abuse or other form(s) of sexual violence overwhelming your life and you did not receive the support you expected. Support from the men and women we are all taught to trust from the time we are small children because it is the job of the police to protect us from bad things and bad people.

A police officer once asked me why I had waited so long to file a report about the sexual abuse I had experienced in my youth. As an adult, that question shocked me and for a moment, it made me feel as if there was something wrong with me for not coming forward sooner. That question still haunts me today because I know it should never have been asked.

Imagine my sadness a few months ago when I began working to raise awareness about the Youth Alliance Report, and learned that young women in Toronto are experiencing barriers to accessing real support from the police. Young women in Toronto report feeling blamed for being victimized by sexual violence. Young women in Toronto feel re-victimized when they report experiences of sexual violence to the police. Young women in Toronto feel uncertain that they can trust the police to follow through when they report incidents of sexual violence, especially if the perpetrator is someone they know.

No young woman in Toronto – no young woman anywhere – should ever feel any of this.

The Youth Alliance is a group of five young women leaders in Toronto who came together to address policing, sexual assault, and gender-based violence against youth. The group was supported by the Toronto Police Service’s Sex Crimes Unit to review police policies and procedures from a youth perspective. The Youth Alliance also engaged in community-based research.

The end result is the Improving the System: Police Policy and Practice on Sexual Assault against Young Women, a report developed with support from METRAC (The Metropolitan Action Committee on Violence Against Women and Children).

The report identifies strengths, challenges, and gaps in Toronto Police Service policies and procedures and proposes recommendations in five key areas of concern:

  • policy and procedures
  • youth leadership
  • training
  • communications
  • accountability

As adults, even when we have a vague understanding of our rights, the workings of the justice system, and the people in place to support and protect us, we struggle. We struggle with the trauma of having to re-tell our stories of sexual abuse and other sexual violence to multiple sources to get them to see us as credible people who have survived and deserve the benefit of justice. We struggle to understand the existing policies and practices that re-victimize rather than protect us.

Young women should never experience these struggles.

One Toronto Police Service officer who participated in the development of the report stated, “Public and/or victim feedback is the best feedback the service can receive” (Youth Alliance Report, p.13).

It is important for everyone this report reaches to read the report and give feedback.

If you have concerns about what is detailed in the Youth Alliance Report contact Toronto Police Service:

Phone: 416-808-8000
Email: William.Blair@torontopolice.on.ca
Mail: Chief William Blair, Office of the Chief of Police, Toronto Police Service, 40 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2J3

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Victim Services Toronto and the Sexual Violence Action Plan


Honourable Laurel Broten,
Minister Responsible for Women’s Issues,
Minister of Children and Youth Services
14th Floor,
56 Wellesley Street West,
Toronto ON M5S 2S3

Dear Minister Broten,

We were pleased with the release of Ontario’s Sexual Violence Action Plan at the beginning of March 2011. The Plan’s expansion of the definition of sexual violence is encouraging for women who have experienced sexual violence but are uncertain about what offences may or may not be prosecutable. The objectives to increase awareness and education for Police and members of the Justice System are timely and we are hopeful will increase the level of comfort women have with regard to reporting incidents of sexual violence.

However, we have learned that Victim Services Toronto is not one of the organizations scheduled to receive funding from the Sexual Violence Action Plan’s four-year $15 million dollar investment. Victim Services Toronto is a vital front-line agency that provides proactive support services to victims of sexual violence 24 hours, seven days a week. This organization has not received a cost of living increase for the last two decades and is in danger of cuts to important services.

In a March 8, 2011 press release, MPP Cheri DiNovo noted, “the funding per victim for the Victim Crisis Response Program has dropped from $286 in 1990 to $31 in 2010. If the government is serious about a Sexual Violence Action Plan, then Victim Services needs to be sustainably funded to ensure that the critical services they provide are available for all victims.” In addition, Dr. Alok Mukherjee, Chair of the Toronto Police Services Board stated, “Victim Services is a critical component of our response to crime, performing an essential role in terms of supporting the victims”.

As past recipients of support services from Victim Services Toronto, we know that they provide critical services to victims of sexual violence and are in need of funding to sustain the high level of service they currently deliver. We implore you to amend the Sexual Violence Action Plan’s budget to allocate funds to Victim Services Toronto, which is the only agency in Toronto providing immediate front-line assistance, to ensure that this valuable organization continues to support victims of sexual violence every hour of every day.

Sincerely,

Survivors Guide,
Sexual Violence Advocates

cc: Hon. Dalton McGuinty, Premier
Bob Rae, MP Toronto-Centre
Glen Murray, MPP Toronto Centre
Cheri DiNovo, MPP Parkdale-High Park
Bonnie Levine, Executive Director of Victim Services Toronto

Always remember that you may have been victimized by sexual violence, but by searching for help you have started your healing.

Survivors Guide

Ontario’s Sexual Violence Action Plan


On March 2, 2011, the Minister Responsible for Women’s Issues, Laurel Broten, announced Ontario’s Sexual Violence Action Plan as a “commitment to protect women from all forms of sexual violence”.

The plan focuses on three areas:

  • Raising public awareness to prevent sexual violence
  • Expanding and improving services for victims of sexual violence
  • Strengthening the criminal justice response toward sexual violence

You can read more details about the plan on the Ontario Women’s Directorate website:

Changing Attitudes, Changing Lives: Ontario’s Sexual Violence Action Plan (Eng)
Changer les attitudes, changer les vies: Plan D’action De L’ontario Contre La Violence À Caractère Sexuel (Fr)

If you have questions or concerns about the plan, contact the office of Minister Broten:

Phone: 416-212-7432
Email: laurel.broten@ontario.ca
Mail: Hon. Laurel Broten, Minister’s Office – Minister Responsible for Women’s Issues, 14th Floor, 56 Wellesley Street West, Toronto ON M5S2S3

 

Always remember that you may have been victimized by sexual violence, but by searching for help you have started your healing.

Survivors Guide

 

Navigator: When You Can’t Afford to Lose


What does it mean when a public relations firm accepts the task of sanitizing the image of two accused rapists?

Today, the Toronto Star reported that two Toronto doctors have hired public relations firm Navigator Ltd. “to massage the message” in the wake of being charged with gang sexual assault and administering a noxious substance. The men, Amitabh Chauhan and Suganthan Kayilasanathan, were arrested on February 18, 2011 for allegedly drugging and sexually assaulting a 23-year-old woman in a downtown Toronto hotel. They were granted bail yesterday after spending four days in Toronto’s Don Jail.

According to the company’s web site, Navigator Ltd. is the public relations firm to hire “When You Can’t Afford to Lose™” because they embrace a “winner takes all” approach when doing business. The site further states, “Our clients’ challenges are always unique, but they share one constant: the need to win in the court of public opinion.”

Chauhan and Kayilasanathan need to win. To that end, Navigator has wasted no time launching a campaign for these clients. To challenge what they characterize as “uninformed views and damaging opinion”, they arranged for the two men to give statements to the press outside the courthouse immediately after their release. The goal of this public relations campaign is to “sway perception” that may damage reputations in the case against Chauhan and Kayilasanathan.

This campaign has already swayed our perception; not away from the probable guilt of the accused men but toward a great repugnance for the firm representing them. As this case unfolds, we will be watching to see how an organization that boasts about corporate citizenship and charitable work further contributes to our community.

Update: On June 14, 2011, new sexual assault charges were filed against Amitabh Chauhan. According to a Toronto Police statement, 33-year-old Chauhan “has been charged with sexual assault and administering a drug for sex” and the alleged victim is a 21-year-old woman who “met up with a man in Kingston in the fall of 2003. Police allege the man put an unknown substance into the woman’s drink and then sexually assaulted her”.

Police say it’s believed there are other victims.

We could not locate any statements about these new charges from Navigator Ltd.

 

Always remember that you may have been victimized by sexual violence, but by searching for help you have started your healing.

Survivors Guide

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The Canadian Government Needs to Do More about Sexual Offenders


How does a convicted sex offender obtain a pardon and then bail when he faces additional charges for sexual offences?

This is a clear example of why the Canadian government needs to do more about sexual abuse and to protect the victims of sexual offenders.

In an interview with the Toronto Star on December 8, 2010, Theo Fleury, a survivor of sexual abuse who is pursuing charges against his offender Graham James, urged Canadians to contact their local Member of Parliament. He believes “the decision to grant Graham James bail . . . means those who have suffered in silence will not feel confident about stepping up and voicing their concerns”. Fleury further stated, “We absolutely must do something about this for the future of our children. I encourage you to contact your Member of Parliament and complain.”

However, this call to action does not stem solely from previously convicted sex offender Graham James being granted bail in December 2010. The National Parole Board granted James a pardon in January 2007 after he pleaded guilty in 1997 to sexually assaulting two young men on 350 separate occasions and serving a 3 1/2-year prison sentence. According to CBC News, “a National Parole Board pardon effectively seals a criminal record except under certain, narrow circumstances, such as if a person convicted of a sexual offence applies to work with children”, and in James’ case the pardon allowed him to leave Canada to start a new life first in Spain and then in Mexico.

This raises questions about how effective Canadian laws are at protecting victims of sexual abuse. The only people who can answer these questions are our local Members of Parliament.

If you do not know your elected Member of Parliament this link will provide you with a complete list of the Canadian House of Commons Members: http://bit.ly/1bjGA

You may also contact the government at:

Toll-free (Canada): 1 (866) 599-4999
Telephone: 1 (613) 992-4793
TTY: 1 (613) 995-2266
Email: info@parl.gc.ca
Mail: Information Service, Parliament of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0A9.

 

Let the Canadian government know that they need to do more about sexual offenders.

Always remember that you may have been victimized by sexual violence, but by searching for help you have started your healing.

Survivors Guide

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Victims Matter


The Government of Canada has launched a streamlined site for victims of crime. The Victims Matter site states: “The government of Canada is taking action for victims of crime, so can you”.

Victims of sexual assault/sexual abuse can find information under the
“Is This Your Situation?” section by clicking on the link for
Victims of Violent Crime. In this section, to get help victims of sexual assault/sexual abuse are directed to:

  • call 911 in an emergency
  • contact your local police service if you wish to file a report
  • contact victim services whether or not they have reported the crime to police
  • click a link to the Victim Services Directory to locate services in your local area
  • click a link to learn more about victim services provided by provincial and territorial governments
  • click a link to the Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime, which is a non-governmental organization

You can contact the Government of Canada to request information or to provide your feedback about the site.

Toll-free Number: Call 1-800-O-Canada (1-800-622-6232) for help to find information and services.
TTY: 1-800-926-9105
Email: webadmin@justice.gc.ca
Mail: Department of Justice Canada, 284 Wellington Street, Ottawa, ON K1A 0H8

 

Always remember that you may have been victimized by sexual violence, but by searching for help you have started your healing.

Survivors Guide

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